Posts

Teaching and Touring in Oregon and California

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Deflected double weave scarf by Robin Korybski, on the loom  at the weaving studio in the Multnomah (Oregon) Arts Center If you love to weave, you need to travel -- because you can gain so much inspiration from extraordinarily gifted weavers the world over. The techniques, colors, textures, and uses may vary widely, but there's a high level of fiber talent to be found almost anywhere, provided you know where to look.  Let's start with Portland, OR, where I taught a workshop on Echo threadings to the Portland Handweavers Guild , thanks to the efforts (and beer, bread, and coffee) of program chair Lynne Fitzsimmons. It would take up way too much space to post all of the photos of all of the beautiful samples we wove, but here are a few highlights. Echo sample on 8 shafts woven on two hand-painted warps (beamed together as one) by Bertha Kao Another 8-shaft Echo pattern woven on two hand-painted warps by Kathy Goetz Two 8-shaft samples woven on two hand-painted warps by Lynne Fitz

April 28 to May 1: The Weavers' Guild of Rochester 75th Anniversary Celebration!

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The Weavers' Guild of Rochester celebrates its 75th anniversary this month. We are so proud of our longevity and our growth that we've planned a four-day-long series of events, all free and open to the public. Hope you can join us! EXHIBIT   Most important is our exhibit, featuring beautiful pieces that are woven, spun, knitted, dyed, felted, beaded, and crocheted (among other fiber-art techniques) by our members. These works will be on display for four days at the Eisenhart Auditorium of the Rochester Museum and Science Center. Some will be for sale and some will be juried -- by Wendy Marks, director of Shop One and the University Gallery at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Prizes will be announced at 3 p.m. on Thursday, April 28. RECEPTION The opening reception takes place on Friday, April 29, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. KEYNOTE ADDRESS On Saturday, April 30, from 4 to 5 p.m., Marcia Weiss, director of the textile design program at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia

More Explorations in Parallel Threading: Playing with Strickler #728

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Among the 10 or 20 most popular contemporary weaving patterns, Strickler #728 (first photo) is among them, I would guess. I've seen many iterations on Facebook and it never fails to dazzle. And if you "Google" the pattern, the variations go on and on, as you can see in this screen shot from my computer.... Credit goes to Joan McCullough, who designed this intricate, ornate gem -- a Rosepath motif in multiple tabby, which is one of the favorite structures of my "weaving mother," Joyce Robards. (Shout out to Joyce, whose "Many Friends" design appears on the facing page in Strickler.) It's the endless possibilities for interactions of color and pattern, I believe, that entice most weavers. But for this post, I would like to play with the design potential of #728 using an extended parallel threading, otherwise known as an Echo threading. Once again, McCullough's pattern shines! The original draft of #728 Above is the original threading, tieup, and

Collapse Techniques: Some Active Yarns and How They Work

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Pictured above: A scarf woven on 4 shafts in deflected double weave. The warp is 20/2 cotton in stripes of teal and purple and the weft uses these yarns plus a wool/stainless-steel yarn (see the floats above, in fuchsia). The scarf looks like gauze on the loom, but when you wash it in gentle soap and lukewarm water, the wool/stainless floats crinkle up and draw in horizontally, creating vertical pleats in the fabric. I love these surprises in the finishing! And one of the easiest ways to achieve them is by using active or energized or exotic yarns -- a large category that includes yarns that will shrink, twist, collapse, and/or relax after washing. Right now I'm teaching a Zoom workshop for the Reno Fiber Guild , "Deflected Double Weave for Collapse Fabrics." I put together a short handout on the active yarns we're using and how they work and I thought it was worth sharing in a blog post. Here's the list -- of course, it's not comprehensive -- along with photo